Professor Tongwen Chen

Professor Tongwen Chen
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Canada

Tongwen Chen is currently a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Intelligent Monitoring and Control at the University of Alberta, Canada. He received the BEng degree in Automation and Instrumentation from Tsinghua University (Beijing) in 1984, and the MASc and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Toronto in 1988 and 1991, respectively. His research interests include computer and network based control systems, event triggered control, process safety and alarm systems, and their applications to the process and power industries. He is a Fellow of IEEE, IFAC, as well as Canadian Academy of Engineering.

Topic:
Advanced Alarm Management and Design
Abstract:
In operating industrial facilities, alarm systems are configured to notify operators about any abnormal situation. The industrial standards (EEMUA and ISA) suggest that on average an operator should not receive more than six alarms per hour. This is, however, rarely the case in practice as the number of alarms each operator receives is far more than the standard.

There exist strong industrial needs and economic benefits for better interpreting and managing the alarms, and redesigning the alarm systems to reduce false and nuisance alarms, and increase the alarm accuracy. In this talk, we plan to summarize our recent work in this new area, targeting a quantitative and data based approach, called “alarm analytics”, and presenting a new set of tools for alarm visualization, performance evaluation and analysis, and rationalization design, thereby to help industrial processes to comply with the new standards.

Topics to be discussed include:
• How to present alarm information from a unit/plant/area?
• How to quantify and improve alarm accuracy and alarm chattering?
• How to study and cluster historical alarm floods?
• How to capture connectivity and causality from process and alarm data?
• What is recent development on advanced alarm monitoring?

The tools have been tested with real industrial data and used by process engineers in Canada and elsewhere.

   

Professor Kamal Al-Haddad

Professor Kamal Al-Haddad
Department of Electrical Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure, Canada

Kamal Al-Haddad Eng. MSc.A. PhD, Fellow of IEEE, since June 1990, has been a professor with the École de Technologie Supérieure (ETS), Montreal, QC, where he has been the holder of the senior Canada Research Chair in Electric Energy Conversion and Power Electronics since 2002. Professor Al-Haddad transferred 24 technologies to the industry dealing with developing power electronics converter technologies for various industrial applications. He supervised 162 Ph.D. and M.Sc. students, co-authored more than 600 papers, two books and several book chapters. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics and IES Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE-IES; he served as IES president 2016-2017 and actually serving as junior past president and chairman of the nomination and appointment committee (NAC). Professor Kamal Al-Haddad is the recipient of the IEEE IES DR.-ING. EUGENE MITTLEMANN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (RSC).

Topic:
New Filterless Power Electronics Converters for Renewable Energy Integration and Electrified Transportation Systems
Abstract:
High penetration of power electronic converters in modern power conversion systems and Microgrids to manage and control the power flow between multiple energy sources and loads cause serious problems to both the energy source and power electronic converter due to the presence of the passive filters such as LC, and LCL and other type of filters. These costly, bulky, heavy, and noisy components with potential to resonance risk are nowadays abundantly used in the actual schemes as temporary energy tanks to smooth energy transfers and attenuate voltage and current fluctuations at low as well as at higher switching frequencies. These reactive components, when used at large scale, will constitute a serious obstacle to the proliferation and use of such a smart grid power devices, mainly because they can create uncontrolled exchange of reactive power, limited bandwidth, and time varying resonance favoring uncontrolled circulating currents that can distort supply voltage and alter the power quality. Moreover, exciting the permanent circulating current emerged by mentioned reactive components leads to increase requisite nominal power of semiconductor devices and power loss, as well as decrease the reliability of the power electronic converters.

The new family of power converters as well as suggested modulation methods will be discussed along with case studies showing the impact of such high bandwidth type of converters on enhancing actual topologies. Moreover, the modeling and control of these new topologies will be presented for various industrial applications including renewable energy resources and electrified transportation systems.

   

Professor Steven X. Ding

Professor Steven X. Ding
Institute for Automatic Control and Complex Systems (AKS), University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany

Steven Ding received Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Gerhard-Mercator University of Duisburg, Germany. He was a R&D engineer at Rheinmetall GmbH in Germany, became a professor of control engineering at the University of Applied Science Lausitz in Senftenberg, and served as a vice president of this university during 1998 – 2000. Since 2001, he has been a chair professor of control engineering and the head of the Institute for Automatic Control and Complex Systems (AKS) at the University of Duisburg-Essen. His research interests are model-based and data-driven fault diagnosis, control and fault-tolerant systems as well as their applications in industry with a focus on automotive systems, chemical processes, renewable energy systems and distributed automatic control systems.

Topic:
An Advanced Fault-tolerant Control Strategy: Performance-Driven and Plug-and-play Realization
Abstract:
It is state of the art that fault-tolerant control algorithms are triggered by a successful diagnosis of faults in system components. Recently, performance-driven fault detection strategies have been proposed and successfully integrated into fault-tolerant-control systems. In combination with plug-and-play strategy, the new fault-tolerant control strategy allows a reliable detection of system performance degradation caused by faults or faulty operations, and results in optimal recovery of system performance.


More information on other invited speakers will be updated shortly.

   



© Copyright © 2018-2019.